Cynthia Beck

Mixed-method Evaluation of an Online Motivational Interviewing Intervention as a Potential Adjunct to Internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Honours Thesis Results, Cynthia Beck 2019

Background: While Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) can effectively reduce anxiety and depression, not all clients benefit equally from treatment. Motivational Interviewing (MI) can result in behaviour change and, coupled with face-to-face therapy, can lead to enhanced outcomes; however, little research has examined MI as an adjunct to ICBT.

Purpose: The aim of the current study was to evaluate user feedback on a newly developed online MI intervention and to explore the immediate impact of the MI lesson on motivation for change.

Method: Two samples of participants, one with ICBT experience (n = 21) and one without ICBT experience (n = 20), worked through the exercises and watched the videos in the online MI intervention. Pre and post lesson participants reviewed and evaluated the online MI intervention.

Results: Following MI, both samples of participants reported a statistically significant increase in ability to reduce symptoms (p < .0001) and an increase that approached statistical significance in perceived importance of reducing symptoms (p < .052). Furthermore, after completing the MI intervention, participants reported increased confidence in recommending the lesson to a friend (p < .002) and increased belief that the lesson would be successful in helping someone to prepare for ICBT (p < .0001). Examination of ratings of the MI intervention and open-ended comments were positive, with participants recommending to expand the exercises and content to assist with self-reflection.

Conclusion: The current research provides evidence for the face validity of the MI intervention and sets the foundation for research on MI as a potential adjunct to ICBT for improving motivation prior to active treatment.

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